Friday, 22 July 2016

50 cents Food Fest - Celebrating Nostalgia and SG's Iconic Food

Mark your calendars next weekend because a friend informed me of an awesome food festival coming to town! This is happening over the same weekend as Invest Fair 2016, so if you're already heading down to Suntec, why not pop by Chinatown for some cheap, value-for-money food after?

Get all these for 50 cents each, or just $4.50 for everything!
Chinatown's iconic food street will be transformed into a street bazaar replicating the likes of the olden days of the 1950s and 1960s, where food was peddled in pushcarts and sold for cents. To play on the common phrase back then that "50 cents is bigger than a bull cart wheel" i.e. it can buy you more than enough for a truly sumptuous meal, all the iconic and heritage food selection on sale will be sold for $0.50 each.

Here's what you need to know:

Venue: Chinatown Food Street, Smith Street
30 July (Sat) : 3pm - 11pm
31 July (Sun) : 11am - 11pm

On top of the eating, there'll be old-school letter writers, calligraphers and even fortune-tellers on standby if you'll like to get something personal for yourself.

View the full list of 50 cents food items on sale here, or check out some of my top picks below:

Char Kway Teow
An uncomplicated rice noodle dish traditionally fried with lard, Chinese choy sum and dark soya sauce. Today, it is a mainstay in most Singaporean hawker centres and food places, and is typically served with cockles and bean sprouts.

Fried Oyster Cake
A Chinese-style pancake snack incorporating chives, prawns or oysters as the most common flavours. 

Kok Kok Mee
Egg noodles cooked with fishball, and popularly known as trishaw noodles. It derives its name from the sellers hitting 2 bamboos together to signal them selling this iconic noodle.

Rickshaw Noodles
Named after the rickshaw pullers who plied the streets of old Singapore, this humble creation is made of yellow noodles stewed in a thick pork broth and topped with fried garlic and shallots – a dish the rickshaw pullers relied on as a source of energy. 

Hainanese Chicken Rice Balls 
Back in the day, fragrant short grain rice were delicately shaped into balls with bare hands before it turned cold, so as to keep it warm for a longer period of time, and to provide convenience to labourers working on plantations during meal times. 


And other popular favourites:

Rojak 
Mee Teh 
BBQ Chicken Wings 
Charcoal Fire Toast Bread
Ngor Hiang Platter: Prawn Fritters, Pork Rolls, Pork Liver Rolls, Egg Rolls, Pork Sausage 
Steamed Cockles 
Oyster Omelette 
Bak Kut Teh 
Pigtail and Kang Kong Soup 
Laksa 
Bird's Nest Drink
Vinegar Pork Trotters 
Chilli Crab 


I'll see you at the fest :)

With love,
Budget Babe

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